In Brief

What About Classism? is a UK based human rights pressure group that emerged out of and has been informed by two important developments.

The first is an analysis of anti-discriminatory legislation - namely the Equality Act (2010) - which fails to identify any economic class factors with regards to this important issue (see diagram below). One notable consequence of this ideologically driven omission is that political and economic elites can pay lip service to progressive sounding values - like equality and social inclusion - whilst, at the very same time, the vast inequality gap between the rich and the poor remains the same or grows ever wider. This reality only exacerbates many already serious social problems including a debasing of the democratic process, the perpetuation of conflict and war and a speeding up of the drive towards environmental catastrophe.

 

The second is the analysis that emerges out of the participatory economics (Parecon) model which can be used to help us better understand the root causes of classism as a distinct form of social discrimination that can be traced back to specific features of the economy (see diagram below). This understanding can then be used to inform constructive and progressive solutions to this important social problem.

 

The key concepts that underpin this project are Classism and Rigged Economics - please refer to our Glossary for a definition of these and other important concepts. If you are new to this topic then please consider reading our "Starter Pack" which you can find under Recommendations.

In addition to being a stand alone and independent pressure group we also support and locate ourselves within the broader struggles for social justice - please see Activities and Upcoming Events (below) for examples. 

If you are interested in getting involved in this project then please first read our About and Mission pages before going on to Register.

If you have any questions then please send them to us via our Contact page. 



Activities and Upcoming Events

For More Information: http://www.sharedprogram.org/